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Malus sieversii. I got a grafted malus sieversii that supposedly makes really nice fruit so i planted it recently. I made an effort to protect it really well since i get a lot of damage from deer. Malus sieversii was found to be the ancestor of all modern apples. Trees were found in kazakhstan that were estimated to be 4 to 5 hundred years old. Trees of 30 meters height! (98 feet) were also discovered. When the apple made its way to the modern world a lot of genetic diversity was lost in the process and nowadays malus sieversii is being used widely in apple breeding to reintroduce disease resistance and other useful traits into modern varieties.
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 Potato onions. My little seedlings are growing now. Some varieties germinated better than others. If all goes well i should get some seedlings of each of the 28 different varieties. I want to wait to let them get a bit bigger before planting them out. I will try and keep the varieties separate to attempt to breed at least one potato onion of each variety for genetic diversity. 
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 Sorbus domestica. After years and years of waiting for fruit i decided last year to tie down one of the branches of my "sossenheimer riese" cormier in order to induce flowering. This grafted tree is 8 to 9 years old and has never flowered yet. This branch is not affected by the disease yet and someone told me that if you tie branches of fruit trees downwards they flower and fruit quicker. I tied some rope to a heavy stone and bent the branch down so the flow of the sap will cause it to flower. I will see soon if it will work.
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 Potato onions. The salad onion i planted in the midst of potato onions is growing well now. I am hoping that it will flower together with the surrounding potato onions and that i will be able to pollinate the potato onion flowers with its pollen. That way i might be able to increase the size of the potato onions. Last year i left some potato onions to flower in my tunnel but they didn't set fertile seed. So by using the salad onion pollen i might be able to cross them. I hope that they will flower at the same time, more or less.  I think my chances of breeding a larger potato onion are better if i pollinate the potato onion flowers with the salad onion, but i might try and do it the other way round also.
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 Sorbus domestica. One of my trees, a grafted "Sossenheimer Riese" true sevice tree,  is sick and has been for a while. I don't know what disease it is. It causes the branches and buds to dry off and die. It also leaves black, ugly marks on the bark. I cut off the top of the tree this winter and i put a heavy BRF mulch (bits of branches) around it and i am hoping that it will recover or at least continue to grow. It is very difficult for me to grow any sorbus trees here as they all seem to get diseases. An exception seems to be the service tree ( sorbus torminalis) that is growing fine for now. But rowan (sorbus aucuparia), sorbus domestica and also different intergeneric sorbus hybrids (sorbomespilus, sorbaronia) all suffer and don't grow well for me. I don't know what else to do to help the tree. I cut off the upper part and i gave it loads of mulch. I don't think cutting off all the affected parts will solve the problem, so for now i just wait and hope tha
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 Eriobotrya japonica. Japanese medlar is an interesting tree in the rose family that i am growing. I have one larger plant that has survived a lot of hardships and one small seed grown plant that comes from a tree that fruited successfully here in central brittany. These trees grow very well in our climate but hardly ever make fruit. So i was very happy when someone offered me a seedling of their plant that had made fruit in our climate. This tree comes from japan originally and is said to produce tasty fruit. In the climate we live in, this plant unfortunately doesn't seem to manage to fruit well. Having a seedling of a tree that managed to make fruit here makes me hope to maybe get fruit myself one day. Japanese medlar seedling from a tree that successfully produced fruit in central brittany. Tree bought from a nursery that is growing in my place.
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 Gevuina avellana (chilean hazelnut). I am trying to multiply my chilean hazelnut by root layering for a friend of mine who would like to have a tree. These trees are really hard to find over here and mine haven't yet flowered. Two people that i know didn't manage to root cuttings that i gave them, so multiplication is quite difficult. I found a low growing branch on one of my trees, took a sharp knife and made a cut upwards half way through the branch. I then bent the branch up to open the wound and i put rooting hormone powder on it. Then i wedged a little piece of a matchstick into the wound to prevent the tree from closing and healing the wound. I took a pot, filled it with earth and cut a slit into one side with a cutter. I had to raise the pot on a support to get it up to the necessary height. I covered the pot with black plastic to prevent weeds from growing, because i used garden soil. I have seen videos of air layering where people wrap plastic and then tinfoil around